Thinking about political events, such as what happens in Venezuela these days, does not mean that one has to give in to any temptation to take side with one of the political parties, especially if one does not share the agenda with either of any side.
A few things one can learn from Venezuela:


1. Lectures of the custodians of mankind’s values about freedom and democracy

The western countries, the worldwide custodians of the values of mankind, above all the human rights, give a shit about them and have no problem at all to declare the core of democracy, the votes of people in elections and the whole legality of a country, as disturbing rubbish, they don’t care about, if it brings a political party into power, that does not accept to get their orders from the western world custodians. All sorts of illegal political actions are not only supported, including military coups, their media lecture their world wide readers, that the only thing that decides about who has the power in a country is who has the command over the military power. Democracy, people’s votes, is a value of humanity-given it brings the right people into power.

2. People matter – for what?

However, the inhabitants of a country and their everyday concerns though do play a role in the power battles of the internal and external political elites, if elections of their inhabitants put the wrong person into power. The US government together with the whole free part of the world counts on Venezuelan people, by trusting that they find people, stupid enough to make the Maduro government responsible for their deteriorating living conditions, the US and their global friends deteriorate with the destruction of the Venezuelan economy and that these Venezuelan people will serve as their civil troops lead by their their Venezuelan deputy sheriff to uprise against the government. These civil auxiliary troops might save them to invest the lives of their own US soldiers. More or less similar to the ways the free world enjoys the assistance of the Kurdish people in the Middle East.

3. How to identify a dictatorship

The non-obedient political figure in Venezuela, Maduro, they want to get rid of, the custodians of freedom and democracy present to the world, as an unscrupulous and corrupt dictator, oppressing the freedom of the Venezuelan people thanks to his support by corrupted military leaders. His opponent, launching once a week all sorts of riots against this dictator’s government is a hero – if and as long he is successfully helping to get rid of the dictatorship, best by a military coups of the army, a civil war or otherwise with an  military intervention of the US military forces. This dictatorship, not of the US deputy sheriff, but of the US enemy, who is ruling Venezuela, the Maduro regime, is a dictatorship, under which it is possible to publicly announce weekly the next riot against the dictatorship and to organize the uprise of military forces against their government, also via previous announcements, using some of the country’s media.  One might imagine for a moment, that any leader from the „yellow wests„ in France, would not call „Macron demission“, but try to mobilize soldiers from the French army against their elected president and wonder if they also could do this, if the first try does not work, week by week again. This, that in Venezuela, where it is possible, to organize daily rebellions against the government, can only be a dictatorship, whereas in France, where demonstrating people – accompanied by more policemen than demonstrators – appeal to their president to resign, this must be a democracy. If elections bring a political party into power, that does not have the blessing of the western custodians of the values of mankind, than we know how the custodians of mankind’s values distinguish between a democracy and a dictatorship. In this case, an interim dictatorship cleans the political scenery from wrong political parties, so that the people can no longer repeat the mistake and misunderstand democracy by voting for a dictator. 

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